Jury Nullification ad campaign comes to DC’s Metro System

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WaPo via WTOP

The illuminated billboard in the Judiciary Square Metro station near the F Street entrance was strategically placed.

Prospective jurors who take the subway to D.C. Superior Court and exit near the National Building Museum see these words: “Good jurors nullify bad laws” and “You have the right to ‘hang’ the jury with your vote if you cannot agree with other jurors.”

Since the billboard went up this month, District prosecutors have been worried that the message could sway their cases. In the past week alone, they have asked judges in three ­cases to ensure that jurors had neither seen nor been influenced by the billboard.

The ads are part of the Jury Rights Project.

From their release:

On October 10th, this ad campaign began in the nation’s capitol. A large, illuminated diorama ad is on display at the Judiciary Square Metrorail station. Two imposing pylon ads are on display at the Archives station. The headline of these ads reads “Jury Duty? Know your rights!” and “Google: Jury Nullification.” Additional matching postcards have been created for street outreach.

The majority of the funds were crowd-sourced using social media. In less than one week nearly $3,000 was raised to start the campaign. Based on this success, future ad locations are in the works for New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and Philadelphia. If you would like to see jury nullification ads in your own town, email jamesbabb@mac.com.

Photos courtesy of James Babb.

Jeff Quinton

Jeff Quinton

Jeff Quinton is an award-winning blogger who has been aggregating and blogging since 1998. He has worked as a reporter, in government, and as a communications professional in Columbia, SC and Washington, DC.

Quinton is a native South Carolinian who has lived in Baltimore since 2006. He is a recent convert to the Catholic Church and is active in the Knights of Columbus. He has been involved in the pro-life movement nationally and locally since 2010.

Quinton is a veteran who served as an intelligence analyst in the Army National Guard. He is also an Eagle Scout.
Jeff Quinton